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Optical and Electronic Device Engineering

Professor
Takashi IKUTA

Research fields;

Applied physics, Image processing, Optical/Electron microscope.

Final Education and Academic Degree;

Osaka University Graduate School, Division of Engineering, Applied Physics, Doctoral course, Completed 1975.03, Doctor of Engineering (Osaka University).

Academic Societies;

Member of The Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP),
Member of The Japanese Society of Microscopy (JSM).

Research subjects;

Development of an active image processing for optical/electron microscopes, which is a unique image processing technique based on the use of proper active modulations applied to concerned imaging system.

Takashi IKUTA

Research circumstances;

The resolution of electron microscopes is restricted by the spherical aberration of the electron optical lens system, compared of its intrinsic wavelength limit. As a joint project between Osaka Electro-Communication University and Osaka University, we constructed a next-generation super electron microscope using the active image processing technique, and succeeded in removal of the influence of the spherical aberration. The developed electron microscope and an aberration-free clear image of a nano-scale chain of gold atoms are shown in photographs.

Laboratory's WEB site

Takashi IKUTA
Takashi IKUTA

Professor
Kaoru OKAZAKI
[LSI Design Engineering Laboratory]

Research Fields;

Electronic Engineering, Semiconductor Integrated Circuits, Design Automation

Biography;

Kaoru Okazaki received B.S., M.S., and Dr. degrees in electronic engineering from Osaka University, in 1969, 1971, and 1976, respectively. He joined the LSI Research and Development Center, Mitsubishi Electric Corp. in 1976. In 2002, He moved to Osaka Electro-Communication University, Osaka, Japan. His research interests include System LSI design methodology and computer aided design techniques.

Kaoru OKAZAKI

Outline of the Laboratory;

The feature size of LSI fabrication technology is still shrinking and the circuit size of a LSI chip is growing. In LSI design, performance optimization is an important issue.

Research activities in the laboratory are on low-power circuits, power-grid design, temperature-aware design, and clock-tree design; for examples, a low-power clock tree synthesis and an automated technique converting a circuit to a low standby-power circuit. Investigation of hardware implementation of software algorithms is also included in the laboratory activities.

Message to students: LSIs have been greatly contributing evolutions of electronic equipments and thus investigating LSI design techniques is one of the first steps for an excellent designer of electronic equipments.

Laboratory's WEB site

Kaoru OKAZAKI

Professor
Kiyoshi KISHIOKA

Research Fields;

Optical Communications, Photonics, Wave-guided type optical devices, Optical integrated circuits (OIC)

Biography;

I was born in Osaka, Japan, on June 1949. I received the B.S., M.S, and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka, Japan, in 1973, 1975, and 1983, respectively.

I joined Osaka Prefecture University in 1975 as a Research Assistant, mainly doing theoretical works on light-transmission characteristics in the anisotropic-dielectric waveguides. Since 1993, I have been am a professor at Osaka Electro-Communication University, Osaka, Japan, where I am doing experimental and theoretical research on the Optical Integrated Circuit-Devices. I spent September 1988 through August 1989 at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, as a visiting researcher.

Kiyoshi KISHIOKA

Research in our laboratory;

Light confined in the waveguide structures or resonators have much attractive properties available to realizing small-size and high-performance optical-devices, and also to making novel devices utilizing original ability of light. Such devise are called as optical-circuit devices, and are expected to applications to the optical communication systems, optical processing and so on.

The photographs show experiments on the waveguide type Er-light amplifier, which is able to amplify directly the light without electrical power, and the bi-stability characteristic appearing in the output light-intensity from liquid-crystal optical resonator, which is expected to be available to a high-speed optical switching.

The illustrates under the photographs show simulation results of (1) light propagation in the photonic-crystal calculated by the FDT-method, (2) bi-stability characteristic appearing in the reflected light intensity in a nonlinear waveguide with periodic grating, and (3) determinations on the location and shape of object located in strongly scattered medium utilizing the DPDW (Diffused Photon Density Waves).

Laboratory's WEB site

Kiyoshi KISHIOKA
Kiyoshi KISHIOKA

Professor
Kunihide TACHIBANA

Professor
Akihiro TOMIOKA
[Nanophotonics Laboratory]

Research fields;

Organic Electronics Engineering, Nanoengineering, Nanophotonics

Biography;

Rather than sitting in my office, I prefer to struggle for developing a novel research apparatus, or retrofitting commercial apparatus to specific measurement needs. We welcome people who fancy mechanical machining or electric circuit fabrication as part of a research work. Personally I like physical exercises like tennis and skiing, and abdominal exercise of eating Italian cuisine.

Akihiro TOMIOKA

Research in our laboratory;

Series of π-conjugated molecules, whose high oscillator strength is originated from exceptionally delocalized π-electrons along the conjugated chemical bonds, have opened a new trend of electronics, "organic electronics," where electronic conductivity is correlated with optical responses.

Our laboratory employs an energy-conserving solution process, with a need of neither high temperature nor vacuum, to fabricate e.g. tiny particles and ultrathin films of π-conjugated molecules. Nonequilibrium processes, like solution dewetting or laser processing, realize physically novel energy state of π-conjugated molecules which implies optoelectronic application of nanostructures.

Laboratory's WEB site

Akihiro TOMIOKAAkihiro TOMIOKA

Professor
Hideyo HIGUCHI

Research fields;

Optical fiber communication, Semiconductor devices for optical fiber communication

Biography;

Hideyo Higuchi was born in Niigata Prefecture, Japan, on October 28, 1948. He received the B.E. degree from Gunma University, Gunma, Japan, in 1972, and the M.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan, in 1974 and 1977, respectively.

He joined Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Japan, in 1977 and engaged in the development of semiconductor lasers, mainly for optical fiber communication. In 2000, he joined Osaka Electro-Communication University, Osaka, Japan.
He is a member of the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers of Japan, the Physical Society of Japan and the Japan Society of Applied Physics.

Hideyo HIGUCHI

Research in our laboratory;

We are working on the measurement of optical pulse waveform distortion (time width broadening due to the wavelength dispersion) propagating in long haul single mode fiber, to estimate the spectral line width of laser diode under pulsed condition.

Hideyo HIGUCHI

Professor
Hideharu MATSUURA
[Semiconductor Devices Laboratory]

Research fields;

Electric and Electronic Engineering, Physics of Semiconductors Devices

Biography;

Kyoto Univ. Doctor of Engineering
Characterization of Electronic Properties of next-generation semiconductors, Investigation of Resistance to Radiation of Semiconductors, Development of X-Ray Detectors, Fabrication and Characterization of Solar Cells

Hideharu MATSUURA

Research in our laboratory;

New fluorescent X-ray detectors, which can detect trace amounts of hazardous elements (e.g., Cd, As), have been proposed and developed. The picture above shows a top view of GSDD (Gated Silicon Drift Detector) proposed and fabricated in my laboratory.

Although various next-generation semiconductors have been investigated as an alternative to Si, there are a lot of unknown properties in these semiconductors. In my laboratory, the electronic properties necessary to semiconductor devices have been investigated. The picture below shows a Hall-effect measurement device which investigates the temperature-dependence of majority-carrier concentration and mobility in semiconductors.

Laboratory's WEB site

Hideharu MATSUURA
Hideharu MATSUURA